Police Investigation

Police Investigation

Are you afraid the police suspect you of a serious crime? There are certain signs you should see when an investigation is aimed at you. First, you should understand what police officers need in order to get an arrest warrant.

They must develop documented proof – through physical evidence, witness testimony, or the suspect’s own statements – that the person acted with criminal intent and physically committed the crime. An accusation by one witness, a single hair, even an uncorroborated confession won’t do. It has to be enough to meet standards set by the courts that there is “probable cause” to issue an arrest warrant.

Once they have that proof, police file a probable cause affidavit with a California superior court judge, swearing that the evidence points to a specific suspect or suspects who acted with criminal intent to violate the California penal code. If the magistrate is convinced it meets the court standard, he will sign an arrest warrant, which authorizes the police to arrest the person.

Unless you are involved in drug trafficking or other major crimes, you can forget sophisticated surveillance and wiretaps. The investigation will follow a basic path to the arrest warrant, focused first on proving that you had access to the place where the crime occurred; next, that you were there, or could have been there, at the time the crime occurred; then, that you had the ability to commit the crime; and finally, that you performed the action necessary for the crime to occur.